vSphere vNetwork

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  • 1.  How to define subnets

    Posted Oct 15, 2009 09:18 AM

    Hi,

    I have 2 Hosts with HA, SAN and 2 Switches. Each host has 4 NICs and the SAN has 1 NIC. (See attached scheme)

    I would like to put the VMs under subnet '192.168.3.X'

    The hosts & SAN with subnet ''192.168.0.X'' to switch 2

    The hosts with subnet ''192.168.2.X'' to switch 1 and the exit to the outside world with subnet '''192.168.2.X '

    All of this is to avoid access from VM's to Hosts and SAN.

    My problem is, when I'm trying to connect from the outside world (''192.168.2.X') I can see only the hosts but not the VMs or SAN.

    How do I need to configure it to make it work?

    I'll appreciate your response.

    Thanks.



  • 2.  RE: How to define subnets

    Posted Oct 15, 2009 09:39 AM

    The vSwitches are a normal network switch and act as a normal switch - it is not a router.

    If you can use vLANs to do this, but this is a physical network design issue rather than a virtual network issue.

    Don't forget to leave points for helpful/correct posts.



  • 3.  RE: How to define subnets

    Posted Oct 15, 2009 10:09 AM

    Thanks for your response.

    I have configured 1 vSwitch with 2 VMKernels with 2 subnets (192.168.0.30 and 192.168.2.30) and the VM network configured on the 2 NICs which connected to switch 2.

    each subnet with 2 NICs. 192.168.0.30 connect to switch 1 with 2 NICs and 192.168.2.30 connect to switch 2 with 2 NICs.

    I can connect with vSphere client to the hosts with 192.168.2.30, but can't reach the VMs (which is under subnet 192.168.3.X).

    do I need to configure something else?



  • 4.  RE: How to define subnets

    Posted Oct 16, 2009 03:01 PM

    Can you ping the default gateway of each of these subnets.

    Have you created these subnets to only support your virtual environment or do you have other physical servers using these subnets.

    If the 192.168.3.x subnet has only been created to support the vswitch then you need to be able to physically route to it. How you do it depends on your environment - layer 3 switching or introduce a router to do the task.