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Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

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  • 1.  Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

    Posted 07-31-2015 11:09 AM

    I am hoping that someone has this in their arsenal.   Much appreciated in advance.



  • 2.  Re: Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

    Broadcom Employee
    Posted 07-31-2015 03:49 PM

    Hi Patrick:

    From a support perspective, I see nothing in the docs on such a script nor found one when asking around. Perhaps some field staff can give you a more definitive answer

     

    Thanks

    Hal German



  • 3.  Re: Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

    Broadcom Employee
    Posted 07-31-2015 04:05 PM

    Is your licensing processor based. Do you have agents deployed on VMs ?

     

    Thx



  • 4.  Re: Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

    Posted 08-05-2015 08:23 AM

    We are trying to get clarification on if our license is processor based.  Yes we have agents deployed on VMs.



  • 5.  Re: Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

    Broadcom Employee
    Posted 08-05-2015 08:40 AM

    I have written a CPU counter extension for Java agents, which you can use with the default licensing report.

     

    You can find the extension in the community documents by doing a search for tag "fieldpack".



  • 6.  Re: Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?
    Best Answer

    Posted 08-05-2015 09:21 AM

    Our CA rep provided the following:

     

    There is a script available to run in physical environments, virtual environments is a manual process.  Below covers both physical and virtual hosts.

     

    Physical Hosts

    •         For single-core servers, count the number of CPUs.

     

    E.g., 20 servers running WebLogic, each with a single core CPU:

     

    20 CPUs = 20 licenses required

     

    •         For multi-core servers, count the number of cores, divide by 2, and round up to nearest whole number.

     

    E.g., 10 servers running WebSphere, each with a dual core CPU:

     

    10 CPUs x 2 cores = 20 Cores/2 = 10 licenses required

     

    E.g., 5 quad-core servers and 10 8-core servers running JBOSS:

     

    (5 CPUs x 4 Cores) + (10 CPUs x 8 Cores ) = 100 Cores /2 = 50 Licenses

     

     

    Virtual Hosts

     

    •         The goal in virtualized environments is to determine the maximum number of physical cores (not the average number) that can be used by Virtual Hosts running applications instrumented by Introscope.

     

    •         Virtualization increases effective processing power of a CPU because of better hardware utilization. Our licensing calculation includes a 1.5x multiplier to compensate for this.

     

    •         If an ESX server or cluster is used for multiple applications, some of which are not instrumented by Introscope, we allow customers to reduce the effective number of cores/CPUs in the licensing calculation as follows:

     

    o    If some of the physical cores are pinned to non-instrumented Virtual Hosts, remove those physical cores from the calculation.

     

    Number of licenses = (num. physical cores used by instrumented applications/2)*1.5

     

    o    If all of the cores could be used by instrumented applications (because none are pinned to other Virtual Hosts), either include all the physical cores in the ESX server or cluster or a percentage of cores, based on the maximum percentage of processing power used by instrumented Virtual Hosts.

     

    Number of licenses = (total physical cores/2 )* (max % CPU power used by instrumented applications) * 1.5

     

    o    If counting virtual CPUs allocated to instrumented applications, 1 virtual CPU = 1 physical core, up to the total number of physical cores available.

     

    o             If the number of virtual CPUs is allocated as a range (e.g., 40-70% of available CPUs), use the maximum (e.g., 70%) in the license calculation. E.g., Number of licenses = (total vCPUs/2)*0.70*1.5

     

    Notes:

     

    Some customers spin up JVMs temporarily to handle peak loads and can have a variable number of ESX servers involved. In this case use the peak number of ESX server physical cores used, if possible to determine.

     

    Probably the “easiest” method of counting is to ask for the total number of physical cores allocated to an ESX cluster where any Introscope Agent is installed, and then backing out physical cores that are pinned to non-instrumented applications, or use the maximum percentage of the entire resource pool for the cluster that could be used by instrumented applications.

     

     

     



  • 7.  Re: Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

    Broadcom Employee
    Posted 08-05-2015 09:24 AM

    The script does not work at all with .NET agents.



  • 8.  Re: Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

    Posted 08-05-2015 09:26 AM

    Thank you Haruhiko.  I'm combining all of this so we can get an accurate accounting.



  • 9.  Re: Does anyone have a script or tool they have created to get a proper count for licensing APM?

    Broadcom Employee
    Posted 08-05-2015 09:24 AM

    The script only works if you leave the aggregate CPU metrics on for Java agents.

    Which is why you will want to use my extension instead in that case.