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Perform a stress test in CA SDM

  • 1.  Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 07-11-2018 01:43 PM

    I need to perform a stress test in CA SDM someone has done this type of tests and if so, indicate me how

     

     



  • 2.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 07-12-2018 08:42 AM

    Hi Jonathan,

     

    Have a look at this document:

     

    Results of Performance Testing Conducted on CA Ser - CA Knowledge 

     

    The bottom line is that this can be done pretty much with any 3rd Party Performance Tools.

     

    ===

    Kind Regards,

    Brian



  • 3.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 07-12-2018 03:03 PM

    Hi Brian

     

    i check the link whit document and matrix but dont found tool set to check you have or found anything

     

    thanks



  • 4.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 07-12-2018 12:35 PM

    JonathanM 

    Silk Performer and Load Runner are two of the more common tools used.
    Some sites configure Web Services as a "moderately easy" way to enable asycrhonous testing. You do need to have the WebServices skills to build it though.
    You can rig batch files to do pdm_load updates of specific data or bop_cmd with frg files. Both are synchronous/sequential test modes.



  • 5.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 07-12-2018 03:06 PM

    Hi paul

     

    you referd to pdm_load updates of specific data or bop_cmd with frg files, is possible you show me or establish how to. 



  • 6.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM



  • 7.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 07-12-2018 03:36 PM

    thanks Paul, 

     

    but you have example to use 



  • 8.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 07-12-2018 04:11 PM

    JonathanM 

    If you perform a search within this community for PDM_LOAD examples, several discussions will appear.



  • 9.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 07-13-2018 09:21 AM

    Jonathan,

     

    Stress testing the app is an interesting topic as it all depends on how you expect your users to use the product, and base your testing on that.  For example - a site using SDM just using the SDM UI are better off testing some UI performance testing scripts as opposed to load testing SDM Web Services APIs.

     

     

    This article covers most of our items that are under our radar: Methods to integrate ServiceDesk with other CA Pro - CA Knowledge 

     

    Here's a high level that I can think of and maybe others can chime in:

     

    SDM UI ->   Load Runner / HP QC -  You would be able to record user sessions and simulate load using those recordings

     

    SDM SOAP/REST API ->  create custom Java/C++/C#/PERL type of programs using SDK samples we have in NX_ROOT/samples/sdk folder

     

    SDM other APIs  This is eliminating UI elements of SDM and interacting directly with SDM low level APIs (similar to SDM SOAP/REST but without the tomcat overhead).  NX_ROOT/samples/call_mgt/gencr_readme.txt  file has some syntax that you could use to create load

     

     

    You could also test other ways too,  maileater / text_api / outgoing notifications (mailnxd) etc., 

     

    Hope this gives a bit more of a head start for you.

     

    _R



  • 10.  Re: Perform a stress test in CA SDM

    Posted 03-20-2019 09:24 PM

    Just another comment on this.

     

    The load test must be appropriate for what is going to go through the system.

     

    I have seen both sides of the coin:

     

    * Throw a gazillion Create Ticket Requests at SDM in a very short period of time, and it fails.

    > Yes, it probably will. But will the site ever come even remotely close to having that type of throughput? Almost certainly not.

     

    * Throw a gazillion "things" and SDM and at it works.

    > Hoorah! But is this the type of load that you will get? For example, SDM can happily process 10,000 - 100,000 simple Web Services calls per second on an unloaded box. But this is not what kills a system typically - it will be a simple bad Web Services call itself that does the damage, or something completely unrelated to the item under load test, such as inbound email. 

     

    So it is important to make sure that the volume and type of load are appropriate for what will be on the environment.

     

    Thanks, Kyle_R.